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Advisers begin the hunt for new National Honor Society inductees

Cayla McGonigle, Reporter

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If you’re a high school student, odds are you may have heard about National Honor Society. National Honor Society, or NHS for short, is a group put up by Secondary Principals Society which promotes four pillars of student leadership, scholarship, character and service.

There are benefits to being a member of National Honor Society. Being a member looks good on college applications, opens up the possibility for scholarships, and most of all, gets students more involved in school and in the community.

“I think the benefit of being apart of NHS is being a member of your school and community and gaining that leadership,” NHS adviser and English teacher David Kintigh said. “We’re just trying to get good kids doing good things in the school and in the community.”

High school students that have a minimum 3.5 GPA, are active in at least one extracurricular activity, and receive positive teacher recommendations are considered for induction into NHS. Students who meet these requirements were informed and invited to apply for NHS earlier this year. The deadline to apply was April 21 and students will be informed of the decisions before the end of this school year.

“I feel honored and like all of the hard work that I’ve put into my grades the last two years have really paid off,” sophomore Cassidy Kengott said.

Once inducted, inductees are required to maintain their GPA and complete 15 hours of community service within the school year. Being inducted is seen as a great accomplishment, but many students believe that even being considered is a great honor.

“I feel proud of myself because I work really hard in my classes and I feel honored,” sophomore Alexis Schutters said.

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Advisers begin the hunt for new National Honor Society inductees